#Je suis got it wrong

Posted on Updated on

From the “wish I had said it first” department, an excellent brief summary of the problem of the “Jes suis Charlie” robots who defend anything said about anyone, anytime. Truth is, blasphemies against the Son of God, and His Ever Virgin Mother are never defended by the leftist secular drive by media, here and abroad. Too bad the Pope did not defend the founder of the Church of which he is vicar on earth, and His Mother, with the alacrity with which he dispenses of his Traditionalist nemeses in the Church as neo-pelagians and other insults.

For whom does the bell toll?

One million demonstrators in Paris on January 11, 2015, chanted the slogan, “Je suis Charlie,”—“I am Charlie,” while brandishing a pen, which has become the symbol of assassinated freedom of expression; this is the official, unanimously agreed-on version of the media outlets and the political parties. But in reality, when you know what the satirical publication Charlie Hebdo really is, you would have had to attribute to each of those demonstrators the following sentiments: I am in favor of anarchy and sacrilege, like the cartoonists who depicted the Blessed Virgin in an obscene manner in their Christmas issue; I am a nihilist and a blasphemer like those who, a few years ago, drew two recycling bins with the caption, “This is my body” and “This is my blood,” or more recently showed a condom in the form of a Host.

On January 7, the day of the attack, Pope Francis declared that it was imperative to “oppose hatred and all forms of violence, which destroys human life, violates the dignity of the human person, and radically undermines the fundamental good of peaceful coexistence among persons and peoples, beyond differences of nationality, religion and culture.” And Bishop Stanislas Lalanne of the Diocese of Pontoise, and Bishop Pascal Delannoy of the Diocese of Saint-Denis were the official representatives of the Church at the January 11 demonstration. During that time, one of the surviving cartoonists of Charlie Hebdo said that he “puked on those who, suddenly, say that they are our friends,” and added ironically: “We have lots of new friends, like the Pope, Queen Elizabeth or Putin: that makes me laugh.”

On January 8 at noon, in the rain, Notre Dame Cathedral sounded the death knell. For whom did that bell toll?

–Father Alain Lorans

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s